How To Prepare For Your First SOC 2 Audit A 30-90-120 Day Plan

Despite thousands of articles, there's shockingly little actionable advice to help startups complete SOC 2. When you don't have dedicated compliance teams or six figure budgets, we set out to answer: When to pull the trigger on SOC 2. Who needs to be involved in prep work & what tasks can/can not be delegated. How to narrow the scope and save as much time as possible. What are achievable best

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How to Write Your Software Development Lifecycle Policy

With headline-grabbing software vulnerabilities becoming more and more prevalent, now is the time to tighten up your development practices into a well-written SDLC policy. This particular information security policy will help your development teams standardize on coding tools and practices, as well as get everybody on the same page from a security standpoint. And come the time when you do have a incident, you will be able to demonstrate to your customers that you do indeed take their security seriously - it’s not just lip service.

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System Changes Policy 101

In the world of SOC 2, the general rule is to write a policy, procedure or log entry for just about everything that happens in your environment. This is especially important when it comes to system changes, as auditors want to see that you have detailed logs of what’s happening in your environment, that the changes are properly documented and communicated across your organization, and that you can effectively debug problems after a change is made. All of these requirements and expectations are defined in your system changes policy.

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How to Write a Disaster Recovery Policy

As you prepare your company to endure and recover from a disaster, two primary information technology policies should be in place: business continuity and disaster recovery. These two policies help you plan for – and recover from – adverse events, but the difference lies in the goals of each policy: business continuity focuses on returning your business to normalcy, while disaster recovery details the minimum necessary functions for your business to survive.

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Log Management and Review Best Practices

When an information security incident occurs, you need to be able to gather as much information about it as quickly as possible. There’s also a very real possibility that you will have to involve outside parties - such as an incident response team - to help you as well. That means you can’t approach log management and retention as a simple checkbox. Instead, you need to have rich data that captures audit logs from all critical information systems. Otherwise, if your logs are incomplete, inaccurate or missing altogether, they won’t be of much help when you really need them. Here are five questions to ask when writing your log management and review security policy:

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Defining Your IT Vendor Management Policy

Here are four practices to consider when creating your IT vendor management policy: 1. Evaluate vendors IT services vendors are generally very good at assuring you their product or service is like oxygen - you can’t live without it! They will throw around a lot of acronyms and buzzwords like “next-gen” in hopes of dazzling you into signing on the dotted line. Resist that temptation for now, and instead create a template with questions to help you do the proper amount of due diligence and select the right vendors.

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Password Policy Best Practices

Passwords are one of the most common targets for hackers, so it’s imperative that your company enforce a strong password policy. This policy will not only define the requirements of the password itself but the procedure your organization will use to select and securely manage passwords.

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Remote Access Policy Best Practices | A Practical Guide to SOC 2 Compliance

Our world has changed.  Gone are the days of an 8 to 5 work day at a physical office, and leaving all your responsibilities behind at the end of the day.  We now live in a 24×7 global economy and are perpetually connected to our corporate networks with cell phones, laptops, and tablets.  The convenience of “work from anywhere” introduces some exciting challenges for your information security and information technology

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